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UMD Center for Orbital Debris Education and Research Announces 2016 Workshop and Call for Papers

UMD Center for Orbital Debris Education and Research Announces 2016 Workshop and Call for Papers

COLLEGE PARK, Md.—The University of Maryland Center for Orbital Debris Education and Research (CODER) has announced its 2016 workshop to promote collaborative efforts addressing critical issues in orbital debris. The workshop will be held November 15-17, 2016 at the Riggs Alumni Center on the University of Maryland campus in College Park, Md.

Orbital debris is a global issue. The increasing volume of orbiting space debris could significantly hinder future economic and national security as the world's reliance on satellites for communications, research and defense grows. Orbiting debris can travel twenty times faster than a bullet with hundreds to thousands of times the destructive capability, posing a threat to space-based communications, weather forecasting, commerce, scientific exploration, Earth observation and future space activities.

The 2016 CODER Workshop has expanded to feature six keynotes and 12 panel sessions that connect individuals and research from across academia, industry and government to foster collaboration and promote the long-term goal of developing policies, laws and systems that will lead to the effective tracking, control and eventual remediation of orbital debris.

The conference aims to address all facets of issues related to orbital debris, and the organizers are currently seeking abstract submissions in all areas, including but not limited to the following:

Space Situational Awareness: detection, tracking, identification and characterization; behavior assessment and prediction; ontologies and taxonomies; information fusion

The Space Environment: monitoring; flux prediction and evolution; space weather and atmospheric models

Mitigation Practices and Technologies: hypervelocity impacts and shielding; end of life passivation and disposal; and mission design

Remediation Technologies and Architectures: rendezvous, docking, and autonomy;
sensors; capture devices; deorbit technologies; and planning and tracking

Space Policy: sharing of space situational awareness data; mitigation and remediation policies;    international collaboration; re-entry liability; and program funding and sustainability

For complete abstract submission guidelines and deadlines, visit: http://www.coder.umd.edu/coder2016

About CODER

The Center for Orbital Debris Education and Research (CODER) is the first academically led center established to address the complete spectrum of issues surrounding the orbital debris problem.  It addresses all types of issues related to orbital debris, including technology and systems, space policy, economics, legal and sociological issues. A long-term goal is the development of policies and technologies that will lead to the effective control and remediation of the orbital debris environment.

The center seeks domestic and international collaboration and inclusiveness and envisions multiple sources of government, industry and private support to become an international clearinghouse for research and educational programs.

For more information: www.coder.umd.edu

 

Related Articles:
University of Maryland Establishes Orbital Debris Research Center

May 18, 2016


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